“Many people have come out and said I’m right”* is Trump’s justification for his vision of the world.  By repeating something so often, and confounding the world with so many absurdities, both sides of the political divide are overwhelmed by his ludicrous and conflicting utterances.

This specter of absurdity blinds one with deeper confirmation bias such that the definition of normal shifts to the new un-real reality.

Please find the time to read: http://time.com/4675860/donald-trump-fake-news-attacks/ a long form essay and response to Trump’s attack on the media and independent thinking. 

*Interview with Bill O’Reily discussing voter fraud 2/5/17 6:49 minutes

Impeach Trump

It will come as no surprise that I’m against Trump, only that I feel I must take a stand in my personal Blog.  I’ve never once addressed politics or religion directly. Apologies to those few readers who thought Trump was a better choice [and you can stop reading this post right now] but he has even excelled in sinking below my worst expectations, and hopefully you’re disappointed as well.

Radicalization has been an Administration “buzz word” for some time now, what Mr. Trump and many of his administration and supporters don’t understand or realize is that Mr. Trump’s rhetoric, tweets, tantrums and policies are radicalizing not only people opposed to our form of Democracy, but the American people themselves who can’t understand truth from lies, hope from reality, and our own despotic leader. Just notice the rise in hate crimes and belligerent acts in America since Mr. Trump has started campaigning and taken office.  All committed by Americans toward other Americans.

It’s time to stand up for what is good about America, no matter whether you’re a Republican, Democrat or Independent.  This man, Mr Trump, will do no one in America any good, nor provide any benefit, let alone securing the world as a better and safer place. Yes, we may need a change, but not a chaotic, catastrophic un-Constitutional and ruinous change that just might bring anarchy to our American streets and worsening global instability.

There are so many excellent editorials and commentaries from conservatives — Bush and Reagan administration officials and supporters — who think Trump’s “character and temperament” are beyond acceptability.

The Republicans, by showing their mettle and supporting impeachment, will still have Mr. Pense and both chambers of Congress.  We all need to act now doing whatever small thing we can do to support Trump’s immediate impeachment. [And for the record Mr. Trump and other Republican candidates threatened to impeach Mrs. Clinton if she were elected.]

In the long run sanity will prevail, let’s just get there before the situation gets worse, much worse. Take time to voice your concerns, I’ve written my congressional representatives.

Listed below are several editorial excerpts I feel might help you decide to do whatever you can to further this critical cause:

Trump, in one spectacular week, has already shown himself one of the worst of our presidents, who has no regard for the truth (indeed a contempt for it), whose patriotism is a belligerent nationalism, whose prior public service lay in avoiding both the draft and taxes, who does not know the Constitution, does not read and therefore does not understand our history, and who, at his moment of greatest success, obsesses about approval ratings, how many people listened to him on the Mall, and enemies.

Eliot A Cohen

And another:

It took us years to find out that Richard Nixon was swilling Scotch, eating dog biscuits, talking to the White House portraits and blowing up the Vietnam peace talks in 1968 to help his election bid. It took us years to find out that, despite that deep, reassuring voice, Dick Cheney was a demented megalomaniac.

But with President Trump, it’s all right out there — the tantrums, the delusions, the deceptions, the self-doubts and overcompensation.

Maureen Dowd

And another:

If Reagan’s dominant emotional note was optimism, Trump’s is fear. If Reagan’s optimism was expansive, Trump’s fear propels him to close in: Pull in from Asian entanglements through rejection of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Pull in from European entanglements by disparaging NATO. It’s not a cowering, timid fear; it’s more a dark, resentful porcupine fear.

We have a word for people who are dominated by fear. We call them cowards. Trump was not a coward in the business or campaign worlds. He could take on enormous debt and had the audacity to appear at televised national debates with no clue what he was talking about. But as president his is a policy of cowardice. On every front, he wants to shrink the country into a shell.

David Brooks